Category Archives: Workshops

BITUME PHOTOFEST

It was a real treat to be invited to Lecce in southern Italy for Bitume Photofest, where I exhibited ‘The Middle of Somewhere’ and ran a workshop.

The drive from the airport set the scene nicely, olive trees as far as the eye could see, deep blue sky and the hot, sweet scented Mediterranean air…

Arriving in Lecce was impressive; nicknamed “The Florence of the South” due to the large amount of Baroque architecture spread across the city, it made for a wonderful and very unique location for a photography festival.

The Middle of Somewhere

exhibited in the charming Corte dei Mesagnesi

 

One very nice aspect of Bitume Photofest was no doubt the great use of outdoor installations, all in extremely impressive historical locations, allowing for the public to engage with the work whilst immersing themselves in the relaxed splendor of Lecce. Where most festivals are over saturated with content, I  really enjoyed the intimacy of Bitume, allowing for meaningful exchanges with some special people and the time to actually absorb and engage with the work on show.

Lost in the Wilderness by Kalpesh Lathigra

Kalpesh’s ‘Lost in the Wilderness’ investigates what remains of the Lakota Sioux Indians at Pine Ridge, an Indian reservation in South Dakota.

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Kalpesh Lathigra with a couple of images from his ‘Lost in the Wilderness’ at Plazzo dei Celestini


Check out the book ‘Lost in the Wilderness’ here

 

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Details from (left) Lost in The Wildreness by Kalpesh Lathigra & ‘For Birds Sake’ by Cemre Yesil & Maria Sturm (right)

For Birds Sake by Cemre Yesil & Maria Sturm

Cemre...

Cemre Yesil with her exhibition ‘For Birds’ Sake’ (detail) in Piazza Saint Oronzo

Yesil & Sturm‘s ‘For Birds’ Sake’ explores the secretive world of the ‘Birdmen’ of Istanbul. Goldfinches are illegally captured from the wild and kept in small cages, nurtured, worshiped and entered into singing competitions.

Check out the book ‘For Birds’ Sake’ here.

BOOK FAIR:  Bitume Photobook – Manifatture Knos

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Situated in a reclaimed industrial space, Bitume Photobook provided a vibrant exhibition-market with some Italian and international independent publishers and several book presentations.

Greetings from Salento

Opening of ‘Greetings from Salento’ – Group Show at LO.FT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LO.FT gallery hosted the group show ‘Greetings from Salento’, In August 2015, Positivo Diretto invited seven photographers from Italy, Greece and Germany to take part in a residency program. The ten day residency offered an opportunity to see and discover the fourteen municipalities involved.

Humanae by Angelica Dass

Beatrice with Beatrice…

Beatrice

Beatrice from Bitume Photofest poses next to her portrait by Angelica Dass for ‘Humanae’.

I had the pleasure of meeting and being photographed by Angelica Dass (for her Humanae project) last year at Delhi Photo Festival, so it was great to see her work being exhibited at Bitume.  Angelica had a residency in Gibellina, Sicily as part of Urban Layers Residency Program, Spring 2016.

Humanae is an ongoing project that intends to create a catalogue of different skin colours. Adopting the codes of the PANTONE guide, whose range of colours invites viewers to reflect on the ambiguity of the word “identity,” when it is used in the sense of equality.

 

 

 

 

 

AUCKLAND FESTIVAL OF PHOTOGRAPHY 2016

It’s always nice to go back to Auckland where i was invited to attended the Auckland Festival of Photography in June..

It was an action packed week for me, reviewing portfolios, running a two-day  workshop, as well as presenting a talk about my book The Middle of Somewhere. There was also a diverse range of exhibitions to check out, with openings to attend and lots of friendly people to meet.

Here are just a few highlights:

HOME, curated by Simone Douglas  was a series of exhibitions at the impressive Silo 6 (disused silos, now heritage protected and making a fantastic space for exhibiting photography). HOME featured work by Anna Carey, Arthur Ou, Ian Strange,  Shan Turner-Carroll and Lin & Lam

HOME at Silo 6

HOME at Silo 6

home blah balh

HOME at Silo 6

HOME at Silo 6

HOME at Silo 6

Outside the Silos on the waterfront was an interesting installation ‘Coming Back Home’ by James Voller. Using McCallum’s blocks that incorporates imagery of New Zealand housing into the site. The work combines photographic with site-specific practices to question where and how New Zealanders’ are living.

HOME - Anna Carey

‘Coming back home’ by James Voller

Also outside the Silos was a small display from the Indian Photography Festival  that included night projections. Here, a selection from (a former workshop student of mine) Vinod Babu.

Vinod Babu's photos from the Indian Photography Festival

Vinod Babu’s photos from the Indian Photography Festival

Meanwhile across town at Two Rooms Gallery  we got to see Trent Parke’s – The Camera is God (street portrait series)

Trent Parke's 'The Camera is God'

Trent Parke – ‘The Camera is God’

Trent Parke's 'The Camera is God'

Trent Parke – ‘The Camera is God’

Trent Parke's 'The Camera is God'

Trent Parke – ‘The Camera is God’

At Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery  Janet Lilo had an impressive instillation made from hundreds of ‘snap shot’ size prints. Just one installation of 3 that made her ‘Status Update‘ exhibition. Click here to see more…

Janet Lilo - Status Update

Janet Lilo – Status Update

Janet Lilo - Status Update

The Auckland War Memorial Museum hosted an interesting exhibition of historical portrait photographs of unknown provenance from the collection. looking at the diverse physicality of the medium in its earlier periods.

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Unknown glass plate negative. The black ‘blobs’ look like dirt or mold on the glass plate but it’s actually snow.

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Album for ‘Cartes -de-visite. From the 1860’s small prints formed part of a visitation ritual. A carte-de-visite, or visiting card, was easy to obtain, being printable and inexpensive compared to a cased photograph. A visitor could present thier portrait card which would later be placed into an album. These albums not only documented occasional visitors to a household but also families.

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Cartes-de-visite, or visiting cards. Small albumen silver prints mounted on card, often with a studio name below.

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Unknown Tintypes. The late 1850’s tintypes are almost identical to ambrotypes in technology, with the difference being that they were exposed on a sheet of black lacquered iron, making them cheaper and easier to handle. Though they were sometimes mounted in cases similar to ambrotypes and Daguerrotypes, a cheaper paper mat enclosure was also used. This kind of mount had one of several oval windows into which the tintype could be placed. Tiny versions of four images on a single mount were known as gems.

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‘Gems’ – Tiny tintype prints placed in fours on a single mount.

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Unknown Daguerreotype – from 1840’s & 1850’s werer made on silver-coated copper plates. Iodine fumes rendered them light-sensitive and after exposure to mercury vapours altered the exposed areas. Washing revealed very detailed but fragile images that were then mounted and sealed behind glass for protection. There highly reflective surface has a very limited viewing angle. Deurreotypes were usually presented in a portable Morocco (or Union) case of either wood or leather or of thermoplastic.

For more; check out Auckland Festival of Photography website

PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP INDIA

EXPERIENCE SOUTH INDIA 2015

I am happy to announce that I’ll be running a 10 day workshop in India, January 2015.  We’ll be photographing at some classic locations across the south as well as some personal favorite spots, well off the beaten track…

This will be my most adventurous workshop to date. So if you’ve been dreaming of visiting India this could be your chance to make it happen! India is a photographer’s paradise… a place I have many years experience with. I lived there with my family and we birthed our daughter Yali in a small village. India is my home away form home…

I’ll be sharing my passion and experience with the group and this will be a fantastic chance to get one-on one mentoring in the field. We’ve also worked hard to make this the most affordable India workshop out there!!

For more details, itinerary and accommodation details please visit this link: samharrisworkshops.com

dont worry for blog004Photo © Sam Harris

 

 

 

MEDIEVAL CARNIVAL WORKSHOP

STUDENTS WORK

Once a year my adopted home town of Balingup, Western Australia is transformed for the weekend as it hosts the Balingup Medieval Carnival. Thousands of people from across the country visit our tiny town and most are dressed in hand-made, meticulously crafted period costume. What better scenario for a photography workshop…

We set up a portrait tent aka Ye Olde Portrait Booth and offered free portraits for all. Above you can view some of our favourites in a slideshow. So while you’re waiting for the next episode of Game of Thrones, don’t despair, just sit back, turn the volume up and check out my student’s portraits of the marvellous characters of the Balingup Medieval Carnival.

BALINGUP MEDIEVAL CARNIVAL

Once a year my adopted home town, Balingup (Pop: 500) is transformed for the weekend and taken over by thousands of Medieval clad fanatics. They come from far and wide… not only from Perth and the surrounding region but also as far away as the east coast. Dressed in full attire whether princess or pauper, monk or maid they really go the whole nine yards.

This year together with Claire Martin, i ran a weekend photography workshop. One aspect of the workshop was a portrait booth / tent set up at the heart of the carnival where students practiced taking portraits. I couldn’t stop myself from jumping in and taking a few shots myself.

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Claire Martin with subjects at our workshop portrait tent – © Sam Harris 2012

The candle lit banquet.This shot was taken by one of our students. Photo by Tony Stefanhof © 2012

Balingup Medieval Carnival  © Sam Harris 2012

Balingup Medieval Carnival  ©  Sam Harris 2012

Balingup Medieval Carnival  © Sam Harris 2012

Balingup Medieval Carnival © Sam Harris 2012

INDIAN WORKSHOP…

HARRIS MARTIN WORKSHOPS & EMAHO MAGAZINE

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Himalayan Diary…

Old Manali – Himachal Pradesh, INDIA – July 2012

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When visiting India you can always expect a few surprises along the way. Something unexpected will happen, guaranteed! Usually there’s a valuable lesson to take away from the experience…

We arrived in Old Manali, Himachal Pradesh after a long, twisty turny and bumpy night on the sleeper bus from Delhi. Of course this was a small price to pay for the cool air and beauty of The Himalayas that greeted us. We’d taken over a secluded guesthouse a few k’s out of town. With views of snow-capped mountains, the valley below and the sound of the river rumbling below, what could be better… Tomorrow the students would arrive…

Early morning views from my room, Old Manali, India 2012

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I awoke to wonderful views and an odd feeling. I was coming down with Flu. What to do… the show must go on, right?! Soon the workshop would begin… 13 eager students were arriving from across India as well as 1 from Slovakia and 1 from Australia…So with black tea, lemon, ginger & honey and paracetamol, feeling pretty rough, the workshop begun… However as soon as i started engaging with the students, thinking and talking photography, everything seemed fine, whether mind over mater or  a sheer obsession with photography (probably both) we completed the first morning session. The students all went out to begin their projects and i took antibiotics and slept…

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in and out of class at workshop hq – Old Manali, Himachal Preadesh, INDIA 2012

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On day 3 Ismail Ferdous was our guest photographer and a nice addition to the workshop

Ismail from Bangladesh showed the class his excellent work on climate change in the Sundarbans and spoke about working on long-term projects. He also gave a fascinating presentation about assisting Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen on assignment for National Geographic. Ismail joined us for the rest of the workshop, his input was most welcome.

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CLASSWORK

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STUDENT WORK

MANALI WORKSHOP 

 

KASHISH PARPIANI

from ‘Sons in Exile – Little Lamas of the Von Ngari Monastery.’

Kashish Parpiani © from the essay “Sons in Exile – Little Lamas of the Von Ngari Monastery.’ – India 2012

Kashish Parpiani © from the essay “Sons in Exile – Little Lamas of the Von Ngari Monastery.’ – India 2012

Kashish Parpiani © from the essay “Sons in Exile – Little Lamas of the Von Ngari Monastery.’ – India 2012

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MADHU REDDY

from ‘Basura’

Madhu Reddy © from the essay ‘Basura’ – India 2012

Madhu Reddy © from the essay ‘Basura’ – India 2012

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SWASTIK PAL

fromFragmented’

Swastik Pal © from the essay ‘Fragmented’ – India 2012

Swastik Pal © from the essay ‘Fragmented’ – India 2012

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FULL FEATURE SOON ON EMAHO MAGAZINE

I can only share a few images from the workshop here, but soon EMAHO Exhibition will be running a feature on work created during the workshop.

It’s been difficult to make the selections for this blog post, which is limited by nature… I feel connected to all the essays…. so this is just an aperitif.

All the students pushed themselves hard and all produced work they can be proud of. Hopefully some will comment here and talk about the experience…

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JENNY HODGE

fromVillage Life’

Jenny Hodge © from the essay ‘Village Life’ – India 2012

Jenny Hodge © from the essay ‘Village Life’ – India 2012

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RAJ LALWANI

from ‘Here is Where it Was’

Raj Lalwani © from the series ‘Here is Where it Was’ – India 2012

Raj Lalwani © from the series ‘Here is Where it Was’ – India 2012

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ASHUTOSH DEV

from ‘Crossroads’

Ashutosh Dev © from the series ‘Crossroads’ – India 2012

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ANANT SRIVASTAVA

fromChanging Faces – Manali to Rohtang’

Anant Srivastava © from the essay ‘Changing Faces – Manali to Rohtang – India 2012

Anant Srivastava © from the essay ‘Changing Faces – Manali to Rohtang – India 2012

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Also i couldn’t complete this blog post without thanking Manik Katyal for all his efforts in co-producing the workshop and to the extraordinary Jana Zilcayova who not only was my digital assistant for the workshop but also made sure i got my medicine and helped keep the students fired up! and of course thanks to Bhanu Pratap Singh Rathore.

Jana took this shot one evening on a regional bus. I liked it the instant i saw it and thought it would be a nice way to end the blog post…

JANA ZILCAYOVA

Jana Zilcayova © Night bus from Kullu INDIA 2012

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FOR MORE >> EMAHO

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>> HARRIS MARTIN WORKSHOPS

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